Wednesday, September 27, 2017

An error occured while using SSL configuration for endpoint 0.0.0.0:444

A customer of mine contacted me complaining Exchange was down, OWA failed, and all Outlook clients could not connect.  They were running Exchange 2013 CU13.

In the system logs, the following error was experienced throughout:

Log Name:      System
Source:        Microsoft-Windows-HttpEvent
Date:          28/09/2017 7:24:32 AM
Event ID:      15021
Task Category: None
Level:         Error
Keywords:      Classic
User:          N/A
Computer:      exchange.domain.local
Description:
An error occurred while using SSL configuration for endpoint 0.0.0.0:444.  The error status code is contained within the returned data.


When attempting to open Exchange Management Shell, the following error was experienced.

VERBOSE: Connecting to exchange.domain.local.
New-PSSession : [exchange.domain.local] Connecting to remote server exchange.domain.local failed with the following error message : [ClientAccessServer=EXCHANGE,BackEndServer=exchange.domain.local,RequestId=3c48101b-0062-4799-b902-07b2b634321c,TimeStamp=28/09/2017 12:47:18 AM] [FailureCategory=Cafe-SendFailure]  For more information, see the about_Remote_Troubleshooting Help topic.
At line:1 char:1
+ New-PSSession -ConnectionURI "$connectionUri" -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Excha ...
+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : OpenError: (System.Manageme....RemoteRunspace:RemoteRunspace) [New-PSSession], PSRemotin
   gTransportException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : -2144108477,PSSessionOpenFailed



If we look at the error, it was complaining about SSL on 0.0.0.0:444.  This is the Exchange Backend Website, the frontend website listens on 0.0.0.0:443.

We fired up IIS Manager, checked the backend website and looked at the SSL Binding.  There was no certificate attached for some reason.

I just re-attached the backend certificate, the default self signed certificate generated by the Exchange installation process is fine.
 
 
Then ran an "iisreset" on the Exchange server.
 
All was fine again.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Modern Public Folders and Mailbox Database Quotas

There is a very good documented procedure for migrating public folders to modern public folders on Exchange 2013 or Exchange 2016.  This article can be found under the following TechNet article:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn912663(v=exchg.160).aspx

One thing that is not mentioned in this article as a pre-requisite but should always be checked prior to proceeding with a migration is the Mailbox Database quotas that are in place.  Public Folder mailboxes adhere to any Mailbox Database quotas in place for the mailbox database they reside under.  You want to ensure the public folder content being migrated to each public folder mailbox does not exceed your mailbox database quota limit or you will run into issues during the migration.

In the event the public folder data being migrated does exceed your mailbox database quote, like with standard mailboxes you can increase the quota to the public folder mailbox to overwrite the database defaults with the following command.

Set-Mailbox PublicFolderMailbox -PublicFolder -IssueWarningQuota 1000MB -ProhibitSendQuota 1100MB -ProhibitSendReceiveQuota 1200MB -UseDatabaseQuotaDefaults $False

Make sure you check this prior to migration.

Outlook Clients continuously prompt for username and password - Exchange 2016 Migration

In a recent Exchange 2010 SP3 Update Rollup 18 to Exchange 2016 CU5 migration for a client, we had issues with some users prompting for username and password continuously after their mailbox was moved to Exchange 2016.

After looking into this further, I noticed the HTTP§1§1§§§§§§ and OWA§1 were missing from the protocolSettings when comparing a problematic user to my lab.

 
The settings in protocolSettings are controlled by the user CASMailbox settings "Set-CASMailbox".  As you see this user has IMAP4 and POP3 disabled as it has a 0 on it.

We want HTTP and OWA enabled with a 1.

After adding the following to the users protocolSettings and performing an iisreset this resolved the issue for the users in question.

HTTP§1§1§§§§§§
OWA§1

 
Hope this has been helpful.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Preparing Windows 10 Enterprise Edition 1703 for Enterprise Deployment with SCCM 1702

This blog post goes through what is required to get Windows 10 Enterprise Edition 1703 ready for deployment in an enterprise environment with Internet Explorer.

In Windows 10 Enterprise Edition 1607, a common practice to prepare the image for deployment was to create a custom default profile.  This was done by creating a temporary user account on the base image and customizing it such as removing edge, store and windows mail from task bar and removing modern apps from start menu tiles.   The profile of this temporary user would then be used to create a new "Default profile" under C:\Users and the old profile would generally be renamed to something like Default.old or deleted entirely.

In Windows 10 Enterprise Edition 1703 however, customizing the default profile results in Sysprep failing with an error.  This error results in an infinite loop of restarts after the first boot with the following text:

Why did my PC restart?

There's a problem that's keeping us from getting your PC ready to use, but we think an update will help get things working again.
Here's how to update:
  1. Make sure your PC is plugged in
  2. If this PC uses Wi-Fi, select Next to following instructions to connect to a Wi-Fi network.
  3. If this PC does not use Wi-Fi, insert a network cable to connect to a wired network, and then select Next.
  4. Once you're connected, select Next, and the update will install.

As a result we must perform all modifications to the image without modifying the default profile on the base image as a work around.  After leasing with Microsoft, we also do not want the Windows 10 1703 image to ever touch the Internet as it will download additional bloatware and updates during the installation process which can also cause Sysprep to fail.

Below is the documented steps for creating an Enterprise Ready Windows 10 Enterprise 1703 build with the bloatware stripped out and Internet Explorer as standard browser so your legacy Enterprise web applications continue to function.

Step 1 - Create a new Virtual Machine with no Internet

You want to create your image on a virtual machine, not a physical workstation.  Do not install VMware Tools or HyperV Integration Services as we want to keep the image clean.  The image will eventually be deployed to physical hardware and as a result we do not want such software on the Windows 10 Enterprise build.

Make sure you use all generic virtual hardware, for example on VMware make sure you use E1000E Virtual NIC, not VMXNET3 as this requires custom drivers from VMware Tools.

Install Windows 10 from the latest Windows 10 Enterprise 1703 ISO.  Make sure the VM is disconnected from the Internet during the build process to ensure it cannot download updates.

Step 2 - Enable Sysprep Audit Mode

Immediately after the install finishes, enable Sysprep in Audit Mode.  You use audit mode to setup the default profile which will affect all users that log into the computer.

Do not generalize the image and simply select reboot.


Step 3 - Unpin Applications from Start Menu and Taskbar

Whilst in Audit mode, go through and unpin all the modern apps from the Start Menu.  Also unpin anything you want from the task bar such as store, windows mail etc.


Step 4 - Remove Bloatware

Next we want to go through and remove all bloatware from the image.  In Windows 10 Enterprise 1607 we could simply achieve this with the following command:

Get-AppxPackage -AllUsers | Remove-AppxPackage

On Windows 10 Enterprise 1703 however we cannot do this or it will break sysprep.  As a result we need to specify the individual bloatware applications we wish to remove.  Here is the list I used on my image, tailor it for your needs.

Get-AppxPackage -allusers *Adobe*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *EclipseManager*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *WindowsFeedbackHub*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *MicrosoftOfficeHub*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *GetStarted*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *zune*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *messaging*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *solitaire*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *bingnews*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *bingweather*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *skypeapp*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *stickynotes*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *xboxapp*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *windowscommunicationsapps*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *OneConnect*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *3DBuilder*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *3DViewer*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *Pandora*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *PowerBI*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *CandyCrush*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *speedtest*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *QuickAssist*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *Office.Sway*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *Twitter*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *bingsports*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *Duolingo*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *ActiproSoftwareLLC*
Get-AppxPackage -allusers *RemoteDesktop*


Also run the following commands so the applications are no longer available for the next user:

Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*Adobe*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*EclipseManager*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*WindowsFeedbackHub*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*MicrosoftOfficeHub*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*GetStarted*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*zune*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*messaging*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*solitaire*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*bingnews*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*bingweather*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*skypeapp*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*stickynotes*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*stickynotes*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*xboxapp*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*windowscommunicationsapps*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*OneConnect*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*3DBuilder*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*3DViewer*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*Pandora*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*PowerBI*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*CandyCrush*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*speedtest*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*QuickAssist*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*Office.Sway*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*Twitter*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*bingsports*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*Duolingo*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*ActiproSoftwareLLC*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online
Get-appxprovisionedpackage –online | where-object {$_.packagename -like "*RemoteDesktop*"} | Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online


Step 5 - Prevent the Image from downloading more Bloatware

To prevent the image from downloading more bloatware when we connect it to the Internet, we need to add the following registry key.  This stops it from downloading additional non essential applications considered by many as "bloatware".

reg add HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\CloudContent /v DisableWindowsConsumerFeatures /t REG_DWORD /d 1 /f

Step 6 - Create an Unattended xml file

Next create an unattended xml file.  I placed this on the image under C:\Windows\System32\Sysprep.

CopyProfile = $true in the XML file instructs to make the changes made in Audit Mode the default profile on the image.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?><unattend xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:unattend">
<settings pass="specialize">
<component name="Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup" processorArchitecture="amd64" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" language="neutral" versionScope="nonSxS" xmlns:wcm="http://schemas.microsoft.com/WMIConfig/2002/State" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"&gt;
<CopyProfile>true</CopyProfile>
</component>
</settings>
<cpi:offlineImage cpi:source="wim:D:/sources/install.wim#Windows 10 Enterprise" xmlns:cpi="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:cpi" />
</unattend>

Also mount your Windows 10 Enterprise 1703 DVD to your image under D:\ to match the offlineImage path of the unattend XML file.

Name the XML file anything other then unattend.xml as this is the default file Windows 10 uses.

Step 7 - Run Sysprep

Next run Sysprep from an elevated command prompt.

sysprep.exe /generalize /oobe /shutdown /unattend:c:\windows\system32\sysprep\Win10unattendanswer.xml

Snapshot the image after it is shutdown and confirm that it boots correctly and runs sysprep without errors.  Once you have confirmed this, roll it back to the snapshot ready to capture the image.

Step 8 - Capture the Image with DISM

Next capture the image with DISM using a command similar to the following:

Dism /Capture-Image /ImageFile:c:\my-windows-partition.wim /CaptureDir:C:\ /Name:"My Windows partition"

For more information on capturing with DISM please refer to the following website:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh825072.aspx

Step 9 - Removing Edge and Pinning Internet Explorer with SCCM

Despite removing the Edge icon from the image in the default profile, the CopyProfile part of sysprep does not bring the change across.  Other start menu changes all stay in place.

Microsoft MVP J├Ârgen Nilsson has created a script to use in an SCCM task sequence to ensure Edge stays removed.  He published this here:

http://ccmexec.com/2015/12/removing-the-edge-icon-from-the-taskbar-during-osd/

This script has also been published to TechNet Gallery under the following location:

https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Manage-the-taskbar-remove-c3024e40

This script however whilst it removes Edge, does not pin Internet Explorer in its place.  Here is 2.0 of this script which pin's Internet Explorer in the place of Edge.  Please download from the following link:

https://sites.google.com/site/cbblogspotfiles/ManageTaskbar%202.0.zip

Step 10 - Create an SCCM Package for the Script

This procedure assumes your using SCCM 1702 to deploy your Windows 10 image.

For this process we want to create a new SCCM Package, not a Application.

 
Navigate to the path on the network to where the Zip file was extracted.  If you didn't see the link above, you can download it from:
 


Select "Do not create a program" and click Finish.


And as always with SCCM, distribute the package to the distribution points.

 
Step 11 - Modify the SCCM Win10 Deployment Task Sequence

Next we want to configure the SCCM task sequence to run the batch script we imported to a package.  This batch script simply imports a registry key to the default profile and configures a "runonce" to ensure all new users that login to the image run the PowerShell script to modify the task bar.

To run the batch file we want to add a "Run Command Line" option at the end of the task sequence usually as the last step.  Simply select the package and add in the command line area "TaskBar.cmd".


This will ensure after new machines are deployed Edge will be removed and Internet Explorer will be put in their place.

Extra Steps

I recommend considering to deploy the following group policy settings to your Windows 10 computers:

Disable the Windows Store:

Computer Configuration --> Administrative Templates --> Windows Components --> Store --> "Turn of Windows Store"

Disable the OneDrive:

Computer Configuration --> Administrative Templates --> Windows Components --> One Drive--> "Prevent the usage of OneDrive for file storage"

Disable Cortana:

Computer Configuration --> Administrative Templates --> Windows Components --> Search --> "Disable Cortana"

Set the default applications to use IE instead of Edge.  This requires you create a xml AppAssoc file with DISM and deploying it with Group Policy.  See the following web page:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/internet-explorer/ie11-deploy-guide/set-the-default-browser-using-group-policy

To create the AppAssoc XML file use the following DISM command:

dism /online /export-defaultappassociations:\\server\share\\AppAssoc.xml

Shoutout:
I would like to provide a huge thanks to Amit Anand from Microsoft for working with me and attending numerous skype meetings on creating this solution.

Hopefully this post has been helpful. 

Friday, September 15, 2017

Outlook Error - There is a problem with the proxy server's security certificate (Error Code 80000000)

During an Exchange 2010 SP3 to Exchange 2016 CU5 upgrade, some Outlook clients intermittently received the following certificate error message:

There is a problem with the proxy server's security certificate.
Outlook is unable to connect to the proxy server mail.domain.com (Error Code 80000000).
 


All Outlook Clients were running 2013 SP1.

The error was only experienced after moving a mailbox from Exchange 2010 to Exchange 2016.  The issue was also intermittent, not all workstations received the error message.

On the Exchange 2016 server the following was configured:
  • A valid digital certificate from RapidSSL was installed on the Exchange 2016 server along with the intermediate certificate and root certificate.
  • All names for Internal and External URLs were set to a name that matched the digital certificate for Outlook Anywhere, MAPI over HTTPS, Exchange Web Services, OAB Distribution and Autodiscover.
  • DNS was configured to direct all connections to the new Exchange 2016 servers.
  • We had a proxy exclusion in place on all workstations to ensure data to the Exchange server "mail.domain.com" was sent direct, not through the proxy.
This error was a bogus error and had nothing to do with a proxy server!

The server was configured with MAPI over HTTPS enabled on the organization configuration and all Outlook clients were creating MAPI over HTTPS connections to the server.

After much troubleshooting, we set the InternalClientsRequireSSL to $true and did an "iisreset" on the servers Outlook Anywhere configuration.

After changing InternalClientsRequreSsl to $true the issue did not occur.

 
What is interesting about this, I set InternalClientsRequireSSL to $false in my Exchange environment running Exchange 2016 CU4 and restarted IIS, I was not able to reproduce the issue with Outlook 2016.
 
I also have other clients that have InternalClientsRequireSSL set to $false that are doing SSL Offloading via a load balancer running Exchange 2016 that do not experience this issue.
 
It is an interesting issue as it was intermittently occurring across workstations at my client site.
 
The issue was definitely related to InternalClientsRequireSSL as I tested setting it back to $false, as soon as changing it back to $false the issue immediately reoccurred.
 
Perhaps a bug between Outlook 2013 SP1 and Exchange 2016 CU5?  InternalClientsRequreSsl is a valid setting and there are many cases where this must be set to $false.
 
Hope this post has been helpful.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Autodiscover: Outlook Provider - 6001 Error for one user only

We had issues with Autodiscover with only one mailbox in our environment.

When we ran the Test-OutlookWebServices against the problematic mailbox, we got an error.

Test-OutlookWebServices -Identity "journal@domain.com" -MailboxCredential (get-credential domain\journal)


Looking at the full report with the format list option "| fl" we get:


Test-OutlookWebServices -Identity "journal@domain.com" -MailboxCredential (get-credential domain\journal) | fl

RunspaceId          : 996337d5-8719-4dfa-b19c-84b81a2ea577
Source              : exchangeserver.domain.com
ServiceEndpoint     : mail.domain.com
Scenario            : AutoDiscoverOutlookProvider
ScenarioDescription : Autodiscover: Outlook Provider
Result              : Failure
Latency             : 16
Error               : System.Net.WebException: The remote server returned an error: (401) Unauthorized.
                         at System.Net.HttpWebRequest.GetResponse()
                         at
                      Microsoft.Exchange.Management.SystemConfigurationTasks.ServiceValidatorBase.InternalInvoke()
                         at Microsoft.Exchange.Management.SystemConfigurationTasks.ServiceValidatorBase.Invoke()
Verbose             : [2017-09-08 04:38:10Z] Autodiscover connecting to
                      'https://mail.domain.com/Autodiscover/Autodiscover.xml'.
                      [2017-09-08 04:38:10Z] Test account: journal Password: ******
                      [2017-09-08 04:38:10Z] Autodiscover request:
                      User-Agent:
exchangeserver/Test-OutlookWebServices/journal@domain.com
                      Content-Type: text/xml; charset=utf-8
                      Host: mail.domain.com
                      Cookie: X-BackEndCookie=S-1-5-21-2167321796-859855631-2145623002-1367=rJqNiZqNgayprdK6p7y3vrG4utG
                      SnpGVlpKKj4yX0ZOQnJ6Tgc7GzMjGxsjGy8iBzc/OyNLPxtLPx6vPy8XLx8XOzw==
                      [2017-09-08 04:38:10Z] Autodiscover request:
                     
                      http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
"
                      xmlns:xsi="
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
                      xmlns="
http://schemas.microsoft.com/exchange/autodiscover/outlook/requestschema/2006">
                       

                          journal@domain.com
                         
http://schemas.microsoft.com/exchange/autodiscover/outlook/response
                      schema/2006a

                       

                    

                      [2017-09-08 04:38:10Z] Autodiscover response:
                      request-id: eee84b62-bc41-4363-90b6-4c47e136a08d
                      X-SOAP-Enabled: True
                      X-WSSecurity-Enabled: True
                      X-WSSecurity-For: None
                      X-OAuth-Enabled: True
                      Server: Microsoft-IIS/8.5
                      WWW-Authenticate: Negotiate,NTLM,Basic realm="mail.domain.com"
                      X-Powered-By: ASP.NET
                      X-FEServer: exchangeserver
                      Date: Fri, 08 Sep 2017 04:38:10 GMT
                      Content-Length: 0
                      [2017-09-08 04:38:10Z] Autodiscover response:
                      System.Net.WebException: The remote server returned an error: (401) Unauthorized.
                         at System.Net.HttpWebRequest.GetResponse()
                         at
                      Microsoft.Exchange.Management.SystemConfigurationTasks.ServiceValidatorBase.InternalInvoke()
                         at Microsoft.Exchange.Management.SystemConfigurationTasks.ServiceValidatorBase.Invoke()
MonitoringEventId   : 6001RunspaceId          : 996337d5-8719-4dfa-b19c-84b81a2ea577
Source              : exchangeserver.domain.com
ServiceEndpoint     :
Scenario            : ExchangeWebServices
ScenarioDescription : Exchange Web Services
Result              : Skipped
Latency             : 0
Error               : Skipped testing Exchange Web Services because the Autodiscover step failed.
Verbose             :
MonitoringEventId   : 5002

RunspaceId          : 996337d5-8719-4dfa-b19c-84b81a2ea577
Source              : exchangeserver.domain.com
ServiceEndpoint     :
Scenario            : AvailabilityService
ScenarioDescription : Availability Service
Result              : Skipped
Latency             : 0
Error               : Skipped testing Availability Service because the Autodiscover step failed.
Verbose             :
MonitoringEventId   : 5003

RunspaceId          : 996337d5-8719-4dfa-b19c-84b81a2ea577
Source              : exchangeserver.domain.com
ServiceEndpoint     :
Scenario            : OfflineAddressBook
ScenarioDescription : Offline Address Book
Result              : Skipped
Latency             : 0
Error               : Skipped testing Offline Address Book because the Autodiscover step failed.
Verbose             :
MonitoringEventId   : 5004


To resolve this issue I compared all attributes from the bad mailbox "journal" against a working mailbox.  To quickly get an attribute dump from a user account in Active Directory you can use the following command:

Get-ADUser username -Properties * | Select *

To compare the attributes against a working account, I simply used the windiff tool available from http://www.grigsoft.com/download-windiff.htm

I noticed the problematic account had the protocolSettings set as shown in the screenshot below:

 
All other accounts had protocolSettings set to "RemotePowerShell§1", so I corrected this as shown in the screenshot below.
 
 
After making this change on the mailbox I tested again - it failed.  This is because Exchange caches Active Directory objects and attributes - usually for up to an hour to reduce load on Domain Controllers.  To get the web app to flush its cache, I simply did an "iisreset".
 
Running the command again and the Autodiscover test passed.